The Emmy Award winning show produced through the generosity of the Jackson
Foundation, Tennessee State Parks, and the Tennessee Wildlife Federation.

Aiming at the Olympics

When the modern Olympic Games got started in 1896, men’s shooting was one of the nine events in the competition. Since then a lot has changed. The live pigeons that were first used to shoot at have been replaced by clay targets. And what was an all-male competition now includes women. But one thing hasn’t changed: if a shooter wants to come back with gold, they’ll have to train hard. Wild Side Guide Lindsay Merwin introduces us to some young people who are doing just that at a new Olympic Certified Training Center right here in Tennessee.

The Olympic Shooting Course was built through a partnership between the Nashville Gun Club and the Tennessee Wildlife Federation. Shooting clinics are held there quarterly and are open to anyone who has participated in a youth shooting program. In addition to trap, Olympic skeet clinics are also held at different locations across the state. To learn more about Olympic shooting in Tennessee, contact CTC Director Chad Whittenburg at cwhittenburg@tnwf.org.

If you’re interested in getting involved in TNSCTP, visit the program’s website or contact program manager Andrew Peercy by phone at (615) 353-1133 or e-mail at apeercy@tnwf.org. Here is a link to a video we helped them with that tells more about the program.

The Tennessee Scholastic Clay Target Program is run by the Tennessee Wildlife Federation. Founded in 1946, the TWF is the largest and oldest organization in Tennessee dedicated to the conservation of the state’s wildlife and natural resources through stewardship, youth engagement, and public policy. 

From show 2801

 

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